Dr. John Matthews || Eye Surgeon || Retina Surgery || Macular Degeneration || Diabetic Retinopathy || Piedmont Triad || Greensboro NC

Triad Retina and Diabetic Eye Center treats retina and vitreous conditions in Greensboro, NC and the surrounding Piedmont Triad area

1313 Carolina Street, Suite 103
Greensboro, NC 27401

336.272.2625  Currently taking appointments

Age Related Macular Degeneration

We treat macular degeneration, a leading cause of vision loss in older adults

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Macular Degeneration

Courtesy of National Eye Institute

Macular degeneration, or age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss in Americans 60 and older. It is a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision. You need central vision to see objects clearly and to do tasks such as reading and driving.

AMD affects the macula, the part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail. It does not hurt, but it causes cells in the macula to die. In some cases, AMD advances so slowly that people notice little change in their vision. In others, the disease progresses faster and may lead to a loss of vision in both eyes. Regular comprehensive eye exams can detect macular degeneration before the disease causes vision loss. Treatment can slow vision loss. It does not restore vision.
 
Courtesy: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health (NEI/NIH)

Diabetic Retinopathy

Laser treatment and eye surgery for diabetic eye problems such as diabetic retinopathy

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Diabetic Retinopathy

Courtesy of NIH

Do you know what causes the most blindness in U.S. adults? It is an eye problem caused by diabetes, called diabetic retinopathy. Your retina is the light-sensitive tissue at the back of your eye. You need a healthy retina to see clearly.
 
Diabetic retinopathy happens when diabetes damages the tiny blood vessels inside your retina. You may not notice at first. Symptoms can include

  • Blurry or double vision
  • Rings, flashing lights or blank spots
  • Dark or floating spots
  • Pain or pressure in one or both of your eyes
  • Trouble seeing things out of the corners of your eyes

If you have diabetes, you should have a complete eye exam every year. Finding and treating problems early may save your vision. Treatment often includes laser treatment or surgery.

Courtesy: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH

Retinal Detachment

Triad Retina can repair many retinal detachment problems

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Retinal Detachment

Courtesy of NIH

Retinal detachment is a separation of the light-sensitive membrane in the back of the eye (the retina) from its supporting layers. When the retina becomes detached, bleeding from area blood vessels may cloud the inside of the eye, which is normally filled with vitreous fluid. Central vision becomes severely affected if the macula, the part of the retina responsible for fine vision, becomes detached.

Symptoms may include:

  • Bright flashes of light, especially in peripheral vision
  • Blurred vision
  • Floaters in the eye
  • Shadow or blindness in a part of the visual field of one eye

Most people with a retinal detachment will need surgery. Most retinal detachments can be repaired, but not all of them. Surgery may be done immediately or after a short period of time. How well you do after a retinal detachment depends on the location and extent of the detachment and early treatment. If the macula was not damaged, the outlook with treatment can be excellent.

Courtesy: National Library of Medicine, NIH

Macular Hole

Dr. John Matthews is an eye specialist who may successfully treat macular holes

A macular hole is a small break in the macula, located in the center of the eye's light-sensitive tissue called the retina. The macula provides the sharp, central vision we need for reading, driving, and seeing fine detail.

A macular hole can cause blurred and distorted central vision. Macular holes are related to aging and usually occur in people over age 60.

Although some macular holes can seal themselves and require no treatment, surgery is necessary in many cases to help improve vision. In this surgical procedure--called a vitrectomy--the vitreous gel is removed to prevent it from pulling on the retina and replaced with a bubble containing a mixture of air and gas. The bubble acts as an internal, temporary bandage that holds the edge of the macular hole in place as it heals. Surgery is performed under local anesthesia and often on an out-patient basis.

Following surgery, patients must remain in a face-down position, normally for a day or two but sometimes for as long as two-to-three weeks. This position allows the bubble to press against the macula and be gradually reabsorbed by the eye, sealing the hole. As the bubble is reabsorbed, the vitreous cavity refills with natural eye fluids.

Courtesy: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health (NEI/NIH)

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Triad Retina and Diabetic Eye Center, 1313 Carolina Street, Suite 103, Greensboro, NC 27401
Ph: 336-272-2625     Fax: 336-272-2617  
Currently taking appointments
Triad Retina and Diabetic Eye Center is a ConeHealth Affiliated Practice

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